How to fix the white balance of mixed lighting in ACR and Lightroom.




The Architecture Course:

How to fix ANY mixed lighting white balance issues in ACR and Lightroom
One thing I enjoy is Interior Architecture Photography.   It is a very gratifying feeling when you photograph a huge church or cathedral and nail the composition.  But what happens when your White Balance is all kinds of thrown off due to mixed lighting temperatures?

Here is the scenario.  You walk into a church, and it looks awesome.  The ceiling is overpowering,  the smells are reminiscent of the days of old, and the ambiance is just awe-inspiring.  You put the camera to your face, you snap the shot, and you get so engrossed in the act and location that you don’t take into consideration the horribly mixed color temperatures coming from all different types of light sources.

When you get back to your computer to edit those images, however, you spot it.  You see just how bad the white balance is and you have no way of fixing it because no matter how far you push your tint and temperature you just can’t correctly color balance the image.  You cry yourself to sleep and hope that one day someone will make a video tutorial on how to fix it…

Good news 🙂  That’s your tutorial today!

But first,  why does this happen?  Well, your camera can only capture one instance of White Balance at any given time.  It is not like our brain.  Our brains, regardless of your predisposition of some people, are very intuitive!  Our brain can look around a room and calculate color in ways our camera can’t.  When it sees varying color temperatures, it averages them for us without us even knowing.

Our camera, however, is not that intuitive.  It cannot average the color temperatures that are emitted from various light sources, so it has to balance for one.  In a church, you may have many different light sources.  From candles to LED Fluorescent or incandescent bulbs, to Natural Light and natural light passing through stained glass.  There are just too many variables for our camera to properly white balance the room.

So we have to get creative in our approach to correcting the white balance problem.  In Adobe Camera Raw or Lightroom, you can use the Adjustment Brush, more specifically, the color in the Adjustment Brush to fix the color temperature issues you see in your images.

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18 Comments

  1. hemant patil
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Excellent tip….very useful. thanks a lot for the video

  2. Dion Gross
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Freaking awesome I will definitely use this make it a lot easier to target problem areas. Dude kudos

  3. jinterwas
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Thank you Blake for another awesome tip!

  4. Maico Presente
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Great tip!! thanks!!!

  5. F Farag
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Thanks sir

  6. Derek bell-jack
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    thanks again blake,another great video on a common problem,you make it look so easy to fix.i will be trying your technique on my own images.thanks again.

  7. Mark Russell
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Holy crap. I've been trying to figure out how to do this for several years.

  8. Денис Гарипов
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Thank you very much for your interesting lessons!

  9. Lemon Squeezy
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    You can do the same thing in Darktable, under blend modes you can choose eg. colors and set the masking range. then combine it with a drawn mask and apply the wanted effects 🙂 Darktable got the best Luminosity masking abilities of all the free Programs out there, as far as I know. THX for your video's Blake!

  10. Larry Lancaster
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Thanks, Blake. I went to my St. Emilion photos from 2017 (green instead of blue) and gave it a try. It really works!

  11. RetsetVX
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    This is fantastically helpful. I have a load of photos taken in a hangar where both sodium and fluorescent lighting were in use. I thought B&W was the only way to sort it!

  12. Christopher Martin
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Excellent this is a great demonstration of a resolution of a common problem when shooting indoors with windows and other light sources. Excellent job this is saved for future reference!!!

  13. Paul Timlett
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Brilliant!

  14. dunnymonster
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Excellent tip! 😊

  15. Impressions Photography
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    This is cool! Here's a tip, if you have several similar photos to work on: select them all in ACR and when you're happy with your brush adjustments on the first image, right click on the little hamburger menu (to the right of "Adjustment Brush"), select "New Location Correction Preset…" and give it a name. Then you can wizz through the other images, quickly apply the same adjustment to them all – and tweak if necessary. I hope someone finds this useful!

  16. Nek Lamp
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    You are the best! The most useful tip!!!

  17. Lev Feriants
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Thank you for sharing very cool tip…

  18. saltystar7
    June 29, 2018
    Reply

    Awesome!

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