Remodeling A 1950s Era Bath




Remodeling a 1950s era bath that has never been touched since it was built can reveal a lot of unwelcome surprises. In this video I’ll show you some of the things you may discover when tackling a job like this, including old wall finishes, poor framing, plumbing and electrical oddities, and more. This project was a budget job done as a favor for a senior citizen who needed to have a bath quickly.

See how I saved the plaster wall surfaces in this video:

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13 Comments

  1. Thomas Anderson
    November 16, 2016
    Reply

    beautiful job

  2. woodmasterguy
    November 16, 2016
    Reply

    Nice job and I am sure she appreciated the work you did…

  3. wayne creech
    November 16, 2016
    Reply

    Nice Job! and nice of you to help out an elderly person…

  4. kerystYT
    November 16, 2016
    Reply

    For all the talk about being on such a tight budget, that came out looking amazing.

  5. Suzy Hall
    November 17, 2016
    Reply

    It was very nice of you to take on this job and it looks really nice. Were you able to give her any insulation in that outside wall?

  6. krn14242
    November 17, 2016
    Reply

    John, this came out fantastic compared to what it did look like.

  7. drochon6672
    November 17, 2016
    Reply

    Welcome to my world. My walls were actually linoleum flooring.
    A couple suggestions from my experience. First, I used wainscoting on the lower portion of the walls.
    Secondly I put in a cheater valve to help with the sink drain. I did have a proper vent for the tub. I opened up enough wall to get at the electric supply because there was no exhaust and I also had those ugly fluorescent fixtures. I had to run the fan duct work through the attic and exit just below the eves. I got one with a light fixture to add more lighting. Also there was only one electrical outlet on the bottom of one of the fluorescent lights. While I had the wall open, I framed in a proper medicine cabinet instead of the wall mounted unit.

  8. Allisa4757
    November 17, 2016
    Reply

    Great video! I'm returning my sledge hammer:) I told the contractor my plan and showed him the sledge hammer and he told me I'd only be saving 250! So I gladly backed out of the demo.

  9. Rudyard Kipling
    November 18, 2016
    Reply

    Very interesting video – thank you.

  10. Mopardude
    November 18, 2016
    Reply

    My first house was from the same vintage and had many of the same issues going on that you pointed out in this vid. Kinda funny as to what was allowed in those days versus these days. Looks good for what you had to work with!

  11. Allisa4757
    November 19, 2016
    Reply

    actually, now that i watched the whole thing, I just want to move!

  12. Allisa4757
    November 26, 2016
    Reply

    Hello EC, me again! Help! Out of anger at my contractor and in desperation I demolished my 1950's vanity today. I was not able to turn the hot water off at the source under the sink it was too hard to turn shut. Cold water yes. So I turned it off downstairs and bled all the water as you had mentioned. I knew what I was doing wasn't too smart, but oh well. I then used my new reciprocating saw to cut the drain pipe…wow like butter. The I cut the lines from the faucet (the ones that are more like rubber wrapped in that rope/fabric material…again so easy. We'll I got it all done so now only the plumbing is exposed.

    However and this is a biggie, I still can not get the darn hot water valve closed.

    If I turn on the water there will be nothing stopping it correct? Water will go all over the place.

    Please direct me to your video that will address this issue:)

    If I cut through the drywall is there another valve that will shut it off?

    Thank You!!

  13. Allisa4757
    November 27, 2016
    Reply

    I have one last question then I promise to stop bothering you with free advice. I originally wanted to just glaze over the blue 50's bathtub, but have now realized that the drainage problem it has had for the last 30 years ( not even solved by continuous 50 ft snaking) is probably due to a clogged drain pipe that needs to be replaced all the way to the basement. I have read about Pex and understand it can be used to drain water, but not take in. Is there anyway to keep the old cast iron tub and solve this drainage problem by using Pex?…sort of like "pipe bursting" that they did to remove the Orangeburg sewer pipe problem? Or is it better to replace that drain pipe down to the basement with Pex or PVC?

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